Greek into arabic essays in islamic philosophy

Archimåedous tou Syrakousiou, Ta mechri nun såozomena, hapanta. = Archimedis Syracvsani philosophi ac geometrae excellentissimi Opera. quae quidem extant, omnia, multis iam seculis desiderata, atq[ue] a quam paucissimis hactenus uisa, nuncq[ue] primum & Graece & Latine in lucem edita. Quorum catalogum uersa pagina reperies. : Adiecta quoq[ue] sunt Evtocii Ascalonitae in eosdem Archimedis libros Commentaria, item Graece & Latine, nunquam antea excusa. Basel 1544

The earliest instance of the passage being quoted as a part of the actual text of the Epistle is in a fourth century Latin treatise entitled Liber Apologeticus (chap. 4), attributed either to the Spanish heretic Priscillian (died about 385) or to his follower Bishop Instantius. Apparently the gloss arose when the original passage was understood to symbolize the Trinity (through the mention of three witnesses: the Spirit, the water, and the blood), an interpretation that may have been written first as a marginal note that afterwards found its way into the text. In the fifth century the gloss was quoted by Latin Fathers in North Africa and Italy as part of the text of the Epistle, and from the sixth century onwards it is found more and more frequently in manuscripts of the Old Latin and of the Vulgate. In these various witnesses the wording of the passage differs in several particulars. (For examples of other intrusions into the Latin text of 1 John, see ; ; , and 20.)

Greek into arabic essays in islamic philosophy

greek into arabic essays in islamic philosophy

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